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Vegetation | Wildlife | Bird Watching

LITTLE RANN OF KUTCH WILD ASS SANCTUARY

Covering an area of 4954 Km2, Little Rann of Kutch in Gujarat State, India, is one of the most remarkable and unique landscapes of its kind in the entire world. The Wild Ass Sanctuary is located in this Rann, which harbours the last population of Wild Ass (Equus hemionus khur). It is a vast desiccated, unbroken bare surface of dark silt, encrusted with salts, which transforms into a spectacular coastal wetland after the rains.

The present saline desert of the Little Rann (saline desert-cum-seasonal wetland) of Kutch is believed to have been shallow sea. The variety of the geomorphic facets of Kutch such as the present surface configuration, its landforms, drainage characteristics and relief pattern clearly reveals a complex interplay of tectonics, sea-level changes and lithology as also erosion and deposition.

The Rann can be considered a large Eco tone, a transitional area between marine and terrestrial ecosystems. During monsoon, the Rann gets inundated for a period of about one month. It is dotted with about 74 elevated plateaus or islands, locally called 'bets'. The largest plateau called Pung Bet has an area of 30.5 km2 and the highest island Mardak is 55 m.

VEGETATION

The vast cover of saline mudflats in the Sanctuary has no vegetation, except on the fringes and bets. Vegetation is largely xerophytic with the ground cover predominated by ephemerals. Their active growth is triggered by the advent of monsoon rains. Although the islands and fringes both have been colonized by Prosopis juliflora, the islands have a richer floral diversity than that of the fringes. 253 flowering plant species have been listed, out of which the number of species of trees was 18, shrubs-23, climbers/twiners-18, herbs-157 and grasses-37. Bets and fringe area of extensive marine saline flats of the Little Rann of Kutch mainly support a variety of indigenous plants like Suaeda spp., Salvadora persica, Capparis decidua, Capparis deciduas, Calotropis procera, Tamarix sp., Aeluropus lagopoides, Cressa cretica, Sporobolus spp., Prosopis Cineraria, etc. The dominant families representing more than 10 species are Fabaceae, Asteraceae, Cyperaceae and Poaceae. Herbaceous taxa are predominant over shrubs and trees. 107 species of algae are present in the water bodies of the area.

WILDLIFE

The Sanctuary is habitat to about 93 species of invertebrates, including 25 species of zooplanktons, 1 species of annelid, 4 crustaceans, 24 insects, 12 molluscs and 27 spiders. Totally 4 species of amphibians (frogs and toads) and 29 species of reptiles (2 species of turtles, 14 species of lizards, 12 snakes etc) occur. The mixing of tidal water from the Gulf of Kutch with the freshwater discharged from the rivers takes place in the Little Rann of Kutch, making it an important spawning ground for prawns. Metapenaeus kutchensis is the most dominant and important prawn in the area. Nine mammalian orders with 33 species/subspecies have been reported from the Little Rann of Kutch, including the world's last population of the khur sub-species of the wild ass. The sanctuary is also a home for gazelle, blue bull, wolf, and Indian foxes, jackal, jungle cat, hare, black bucks and wild boar.

BIRD WATCHING

The vast expansion of brazen land is also a heaven for the birds and bird-watchers. The unique ecosystem of the sanctuary provides an important feeding, breeding and roosting habitat for a large number of birds. Its strategic location on the bird migration route and its connection with the dynamic Gulf of Kutch makes it a perfect choice for birds. Many parts of the Little Rann of Kutch provide ideal breeding grounds for some of the largest flocks of Greater and Lesser flamingos.

According to an estimate about 70,000-75,000 birds nests in an area spread over 250 acres. One of the most threatened birds, the great Indian bustard finds a refuge in certain pockets of protected areas. Birds like houbara bustard, francolin partridge, bustard quails, Indian sand grouse, desert wheatear, steppe eagle, short toed eagle, vulture, imperial eagle, laggard falcon, flamingos, ducks, cranes, pelicans and storks are found here.

There is also a fabulous lake called 'Nava Talav' built during the British Rule near Bajana. The lake, built to store excess water from nearby villages now serves as a home to many birds.

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